on the road again… | new mexico | roswell

Roswell 24 (1 of 1)

The aliens are organized. And their headquarters is, obviously, in downtown Roswell.
The aliens are organized. And their headquarters is, obviously, in downtown Roswell.

Roswell 7 (1 of 1)

Roswell 9 (1 of 1)

Roswell 8 (1 of 1)

Roswell 23 (1 of 1)

Not quite equal parts legit museum and tourist trap (I'd say 75/25 in favor of museum), the International UFO Museum and Research Center tackles the Roswell incident at Area 51 from all angles, offering evidence for both believer and skeptics alike.
Not quite equal parts legit museum and tourist trap (I’d say 75/25 in favor of museum), the International UFO Museum and Research Center tackles the Roswell incident at Area 51 from all angles, offering evidence for both believer and skeptics alike.

Roswell 11 (1 of 1)

Roswell 12 (1 of 1)

Roswell 13 (1 of 1)

 

Roswell 15 (1 of 1)

One of the cooler features of the International UFO Museum and Research Center: life-size (??) grey aliens, complete with periodic bursts of smoke from a life-size (??) saucer.
One of the cooler features of the International UFO Museum and Research Center: life-size (??) grey aliens, complete with periodic bursts of smoke from a life-size (??) saucer.

Roswell 16 (1 of 1)

Roswell 18 (1 of 1)

Roswell 20 (1 of 1)
Wait…Bigfoot is an ALIEN?!?!?!?!?!?

Roswell 21 (1 of 1)

Roswell 22 (1 of 1)
Yes. This is a reproduction of an alien autopsy. Complete with a Man in Black. I have no words.
Interesting business model. I wonder what brings in the most profit?
Interesting business model. I wonder what brings in the most profit?
#non-earthlingmarriageequality #spaceloveislove
#non-earthlingmarriageequality #spaceloveislove

Roswell 27 (1 of 1)

Even McDonald's is space-craft-shaped.
Even McDonald’s is space-craft-shaped.
En route from Roswell to Hobbs.
En route from Roswell to Hobbs.

 

Roswell 1 (1 of 1)
How cute is this little dude??? I watched him finish CROSSING THE HIGHWAY en route from Roswell to Hobbs yesterday. Turtle’s got balls. That could be either a metaphorical or literal statement. I didn’t attempt to gender the turtle. Seemed rude. We just met. Also, not really my business.
You'd think after living in Roswell and dealing with extraterrestrials, this turtle would be cool with me and my camera...
You’d think after living in Roswell and dealing with extraterrestrials, this turtle would be cool with me and my camera…
Nope. He was NOT feeling me.
Nope. He was NOT feeling me.

 

on the road again…| new mexico | albuquerque | boca negra canyon, petroglyph national monument

One of the signs along the trail reads that “[s]ome Pueblo elders believe that the petroglyphs choose when and to whom to reveal themselves to.”
Petroglyph Park Boca Negra Canyon 1 (1 of 1)

Petroglyph Park Boca Negra Canyon 11 (1 of 1)

Petroglyph Park Boca Negra Canyon 5 (1 of 1)

Let's play Petroglyph Pictionary: I see a wild turkey chasing a man in a top hat. Thoughts?
The original meaning of many of the petroglyphs have been lost to time, so they’re open to interpretation. It’s like Petroglyph Pictionary: I see a wild turkey chasing a man in a top hat carrying a large pot…
And this one is clearly Lady Gaga surrounded by moon men alongside their starship.
And this one is clearly Lady Gaga surrounded by moon men alongside their starship.
And here's an angry crab sneaking up on a dapper gentleman in suspenders.
And here’s an angry crab sneaking up on a dapper gentleman in suspenders. Nailed it.

Canyon Road 14 (1 of 1)

Boca Negra Canyon 97 (1 of 1)

Petroglyph Park 2 (1 of 1)

And I was in heels. No one is surprised.
And I was in heels. No one is surprised.

 

 

Petroglyph Park Boca Negra Canyon 16 (1 of 1)

Boca Negra Canyon 91 (1 of 1)
I cannot emphasize enough how happy I was to NOT see any snakes.

on the road again…| new mexico | santa fe | canyon road

While I was in town, I knew I needed to take a couple hours and visit Canyon Road, Santa Fe's renowned art district. So many galleries!!
While I was in town, I knew I needed to take a couple of hours and visit Canyon Road, Santa Fe’s renowned art district. So many galleries!!

Canyon Road 7 (1 of 1)
Hands down my favorite gallery of the ones I visited. Superbly curated.
Zaplin-Lampert Gallery's outdoor sculptures.
Zaplin-Lampert Gallery’s outdoor sculptures.

Canyon Road 10 (1 of 1)

Canyon Road 11 (1 of 1)

Outside the Morning Star Gallery
Outside the Morning Star Gallery
On the exterior walls of the New Concept Gallery
On the exterior walls of the New Concept Gallery
I was SO TEMPTED to buy a pair of vintage cowboy boots...but it still feels a bit to much like unearned cultural appropriation at this point...
I was SO TEMPTED to buy a pair of vintage cowboy boots…but it still feels a bit too much like unearned cultural appropriation at this point…

I wanted to take a minute and share with you the work of some artists I found super exciting:

 

Layers in a Dream by Hilario Guiterrez | Tansey Contemporary. Image via artsy.net
Layers in a Dream by Hilario Gutierrez | Tansey Contemporary. Image via artsy.net

 

Steatite Interior, sculpture by Jerry Wingren | Tansey Contemporary. Image via their website.
Steatite Interior, sculpture by Jerry Wingren | Tansey Contemporary. Image via their website.
"Lemons, Mango and Pear" , an oil by Jeff Uffelman. Photo via the Gallery 1261 website
“Lemons, Mango and Pear”, an oil by Jeff Uffelman. Photo via the Gallery 1261 website
Retreating Light, an oil on canvas by Jane Cook; I think I saw this at the New Concept Gallery (I have to get better at taking clear notes!); image via Jane Cook's website.
Retreating Light, an oil on canvas by Jane Cook; I think I saw this at the New Concept Gallery (I have to get better at taking clear notes!); image via Jane Cook’s website.

Before I go, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention two things.

Thing the first: very few of the gallerists took me seriously as a potential buyer, which I found to be super ageist. I’m sure, statistically, their clientele are significantly older than me, but there were a few pieces in my budget that I would have seriously considered purchasing (if not then, that at a later date) if they weren’t giving me the stink eye. Was definitely (internally) channeling Julia Roberts at a couple points.

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Fine art can be a really solid financial investment (one I eventually plan on making…though I’m very much in the research phase…) depending upon factors such as the artist’s resumé (where they’ve shown) and body of work (who they’ve sold to and for how much), which leads me to thing the second: there was one gallery (which shall not be named) that was absolutely guilty of featuring a certain photographer whose work, while OK, was definitely not on par with the work in the rest of the gallery, let alone the rest of the galleries on the block. Yes, I know galleries need to make money, but this dude’s pieces were street-fair-level-good, at best, and significantly overpriced. I’m taking $450-600 for a large print. He had a decent eye, an expensive camera and a working knowledge of photoshop. I know art is entirely subjective and I am potentially jaded because I know my way around Lightroom, but his work looked like slightly artsier versions of stock photos of the Southwest, and, imho, belonged in the shops in historic Santa Fe that sold the Dias de los Muertos dolls and Mexican jumping beans, priced appropriately at $150-250 (slightly less unframed).  The whole exhibit, complete with large banner outside the gallery, just screamed “tourist trap.” And considering most of the tourists to Canyon Road were senior citizens, it didn’t sit right with me. I put myself in their shoes: Imagine I’m a typical middle class senior. I save for a trip to Santa Fe, and I want to visit the arts district and purchase some art. When I walk into the galleries, I start to notice that most pieces are well more than I anticipated: $2,500-25,000. There are even large sculptures for sale with price tags in the triple digits!  I start to feel a bit silly, thinking I could be the owner of a piece of contemporary art when I happen upon the gallery-which-shall-not-be-named. In the front room are large photographs of New Mexico and the Southwest. They’re really very pretty. I don’t feel a deep-heart-level connection to the work, but $500 is in my budget! The girls at book club are going to be so envious when they see that I bought ART at a REAL LIFE GALLERY on CANYON ROAD! I don’t know to research the artist prior to buying (if I did, I’d find that he hasn’t shown anywhere significant or had any major solo shows, and isn’t at the beginning of his career…which are all red flags), and I have no idea that this piece, in all likelihood, isn’t going to appreciate in value, so selling it after I’m gone probably won’t make the dent I envision it will in paying for my grandkid’s college education. I trust the gallerist, because knowing the art market and pricing pieces accordingly is their job, right?

I know, I know. My entire rant screams #FirstWorldWhitePeopleProblems. I just don’t like seeing anyone taken advantage of. Period. They probably hate thirty-somethings like me with art history degrees and enough knowledge of the art market to be dangerous…

**steps off soapbox**

on the road again…| new mexico | kasha-katuwe tent rocks national monument

I bought a new lens and a new filter (used) at a local camera shop in Santa Fe. What a difference!! These rocks were several hundred feet above the trail.
Tent Rocks 4 (1 of 1)
If you find yourself in the Santa Fe/Los Alamos/ Albuquerque area and have some time, this hike is well worth it. In the summer, go early in the day to avoid the crowds and take the Slot Canyon Trail first. Wear shoes w/ good traction, as most of the trail is sandy and rocky…a combination that put me flat on my ass a couple times.

Tent Rocks 78 (1 of 1)

Tent Rocks 6 (1 of 1)
There are parts of the trail, especially in Shelter Cave, that are super narrow, with only room to pass single-file as you scramble up rocks and slip under huge boulders.

Tent Rocks 7 (1 of 1)

Tent Rocks 11 (1 of 1)

Then I accidentally interrupted this little guy/girl's nap...
Then I accidentally interrupted this little guy/girl’s nap…
...much to their chagrin...
…much to their chagrin. Owl is not amused.

Tent Rocks 29 (1 of 1)

Tent Rocks 33 (1 of 1)

In the canyon...
In the canyon…

Tent Rocks 44 (1 of 1)

Tent Rocks 42 (1 of 1)

Tent Rocks 45 (1 of 1)

Nope. That's not a dead end. That's the trail. Just one of many examples of rocks one must scramble to reach the top of the canyon. Also, there were lots of seniors on the trail. Scaling the rocks and taking names. Super inspiring!
Nope. That’s not a dead end. That’s the trail. Just one of many examples of rocks one must scramble to reach the top of the canyon.  Also, there were lots of seniors on the trail. Scaling the rocks and taking names. Super inspiring!
On the other side of those rocks...
On the other side of those rocks…
More of the trail.
More of the trail.
Tent rocks! From the Bureau of Land Management website: "The cone-shaped tent rock formations are the products of volcanic eruptions that occurred 6 to 7 million years ago and left pumice, ash, and tuff deposits over 1,000 feet thick. Tremendous explosions from the Jemez volcanic field spewed pyroclasts (rock fragments), while searing hot gases blasted down slopes in an incandescent avalanche called a “pyroclastic flow.”"
Tent rocks! From the Bureau of Land Management website: “The cone-shaped tent rock formations are the products of volcanic eruptions that occurred 6 to 7 million years ago and left pumice, ash, and tuff deposits over 1,000 feet thick. Tremendous explosions from the Jemez volcanic field spewed pyroclasts (rock fragments), while searing hot gases blasted down slopes in an incandescent avalanche called a ‘pyroclastic flow.'”
The trail gradually climbs in elevation through the cave and into the canyon. The last bit of the trail climbs 600+ feet to the top of the canyon, where you can see the tent rocks from above.
The trail gradually climbs in elevation through the cave and into the canyon. The last bit of the trail climbs 600+ feet to the top of the canyon, where you can see the tent rocks from above.

Starting to climb higher.
Starting to climb higher.

 

Getting closer...
Getting closer…

Almost there...
Almost there…

Tent Rocks 62 (1 of 1)

Tent Rocks 60 (1 of 1)

My least favorite part of the trail. The trail starts again on the top of that ledge, which is about chest-high. I had to hoist myself up and just ignore the fact that, behind that brush, is a sheer sandy drop into the canyon below. Those that know me well know two things about me are true: 1) I am way more comfortable in 4-inch heels than I am in hiking boots and 2) I do not do well with heights. To say I am beyond proud of myself is an understatement.
My least favorite part of the trail. The trail starts again on the top of that ledge, which is about chest-high. I had to hoist myself up and just ignore the fact that, behind that brush, is a sheer sandy drop into the canyon below. Those that know me well know two things about me are true: 1) I am way more comfortable in 4-inch heels than I am in hiking boots and 2) I do not do well with heights. To say I am beyond proud of myself is an understatement.
View from the top.
View from the top.
The same tent rocks from above.
The same tent rocks from above.

Tent Rocks 69 (1 of 1)

From the Cave Loop trailhead. Luckily, I did not encounter any snakes...
From the Cave Loop trailhead. Luckily, I did not encounter any snakes…

Tent Rocks 52 (1 of 1)

Top of the Slot Canyon Loop trail seen from below
Top of the Slot Canyon Loop trail seen from below. I still can’t believe I was up there.
The cave for which the trail is named.
The cave for which the trail is named.

Tent Rocks 73 (1 of 1) Tent Rocks 74 (1 of 1)

Tent Rocks 75 (1 of 1)