on the road again…| new mexico | santa fe | meow wolf | house of eternal return

Words are failing me as I attempt to describe the immersive, strange, beautiful experience that is Meow Wolf, so I’m going to defer to their website:

Meow Wolf is an arts production company that creates immersive, multimedia experiences that transport audiences of all ages into fantastic realms of storytelling. Our work is a combination of jungle gym, haunted house, children’s museum, and immersive art exhibit. This unique fusion of art and entertainment gives audiences fictional worlds to explore.”

I could have wandered around in there for hours, and over Memorial Day weekend, they expanded and added more rooms, so I’m definitely going to have to find time to go back. If you ever find yourself in Santa Fe, definitely check it out!

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Meow Wolf 4 (1 of 1)

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Meow Wolf 5 (1 of 1)

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There’s a secret room where you can play a laser synth. It’s kind of amazing.

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on the road again…| new mexico | santa fe | loretto chapel

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“Two mysteries surround the spiral staircase in the Loretto Chapel: the identity of its builder and the physics of its construction. When the Loretto Chapel was completed in 1878, there was no way to access the choir loft twenty-two feet above. Carpenters were called in to address the problem, but they all concluded access to the loft would have to be via ladder as a staircase would interfere with the interior space of the small Chapel. Legend says that to find a solution to the seating problem, the Sisters of the Chapel made a novena to St. Joseph, the patron saint of carpenters. On the ninth and final day of prayer, a man appeared at the Chapel with a donkey and a toolbox looking for work. Months later, the elegant circular staircase was completed, and the carpenter disappeared without pay or thanks. After searching for the man (an ad even ran in the local newspaper) and finding no trace of him, some concluded that he was St. Joseph himself, having come in answer to the sisters’ prayers. The stairway’s carpenter, whoever he was, built a magnificent structure. The design was innovative for the time and some of the design considerations still perplex experts today. The staircase has two 360 degree turns and no visible means of support. Also, it is said that the staircase was built without nails—only wooden pegs. Questions also surround the number of stair risers relative to the height of the choir loft and about the types of wood and other materials used in the stairway’s construction.” source: the Loretto Chapel website

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Loretto Chapel 13 (1 of 1)

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on the road again…| new mexico | santa fe | canyon road

While I was in town, I knew I needed to take a couple hours and visit Canyon Road, Santa Fe's renowned art district. So many galleries!!
While I was in town, I knew I needed to take a couple of hours and visit Canyon Road, Santa Fe’s renowned art district. So many galleries!!

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Hands down my favorite gallery of the ones I visited. Superbly curated.
Zaplin-Lampert Gallery's outdoor sculptures.
Zaplin-Lampert Gallery’s outdoor sculptures.

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Outside the Morning Star Gallery
Outside the Morning Star Gallery
On the exterior walls of the New Concept Gallery
On the exterior walls of the New Concept Gallery
I was SO TEMPTED to buy a pair of vintage cowboy boots...but it still feels a bit to much like unearned cultural appropriation at this point...
I was SO TEMPTED to buy a pair of vintage cowboy boots…but it still feels a bit too much like unearned cultural appropriation at this point…

I wanted to take a minute and share with you the work of some artists I found super exciting:

 

Layers in a Dream by Hilario Guiterrez | Tansey Contemporary. Image via artsy.net
Layers in a Dream by Hilario Gutierrez | Tansey Contemporary. Image via artsy.net

 

Steatite Interior, sculpture by Jerry Wingren | Tansey Contemporary. Image via their website.
Steatite Interior, sculpture by Jerry Wingren | Tansey Contemporary. Image via their website.
"Lemons, Mango and Pear" , an oil by Jeff Uffelman. Photo via the Gallery 1261 website
“Lemons, Mango and Pear”, an oil by Jeff Uffelman. Photo via the Gallery 1261 website
Retreating Light, an oil on canvas by Jane Cook; I think I saw this at the New Concept Gallery (I have to get better at taking clear notes!); image via Jane Cook's website.
Retreating Light, an oil on canvas by Jane Cook; I think I saw this at the New Concept Gallery (I have to get better at taking clear notes!); image via Jane Cook’s website.

Before I go, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention two things.

Thing the first: very few of the gallerists took me seriously as a potential buyer, which I found to be super ageist. I’m sure, statistically, their clientele are significantly older than me, but there were a few pieces in my budget that I would have seriously considered purchasing (if not then, that at a later date) if they weren’t giving me the stink eye. Was definitely (internally) channeling Julia Roberts at a couple points.

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Fine art can be a really solid financial investment (one I eventually plan on making…though I’m very much in the research phase…) depending upon factors such as the artist’s resumé (where they’ve shown) and body of work (who they’ve sold to and for how much), which leads me to thing the second: there was one gallery (which shall not be named) that was absolutely guilty of featuring a certain photographer whose work, while OK, was definitely not on par with the work in the rest of the gallery, let alone the rest of the galleries on the block. Yes, I know galleries need to make money, but this dude’s pieces were street-fair-level-good, at best, and significantly overpriced. I’m taking $450-600 for a large print. He had a decent eye, an expensive camera and a working knowledge of photoshop. I know art is entirely subjective and I am potentially jaded because I know my way around Lightroom, but his work looked like slightly artsier versions of stock photos of the Southwest, and, imho, belonged in the shops in historic Santa Fe that sold the Dias de los Muertos dolls and Mexican jumping beans, priced appropriately at $150-250 (slightly less unframed).  The whole exhibit, complete with large banner outside the gallery, just screamed “tourist trap.” And considering most of the tourists to Canyon Road were senior citizens, it didn’t sit right with me. I put myself in their shoes: Imagine I’m a typical middle class senior. I save for a trip to Santa Fe, and I want to visit the arts district and purchase some art. When I walk into the galleries, I start to notice that most pieces are well more than I anticipated: $2,500-25,000. There are even large sculptures for sale with price tags in the triple digits!  I start to feel a bit silly, thinking I could be the owner of a piece of contemporary art when I happen upon the gallery-which-shall-not-be-named. In the front room are large photographs of New Mexico and the Southwest. They’re really very pretty. I don’t feel a deep-heart-level connection to the work, but $500 is in my budget! The girls at book club are going to be so envious when they see that I bought ART at a REAL LIFE GALLERY on CANYON ROAD! I don’t know to research the artist prior to buying (if I did, I’d find that he hasn’t shown anywhere significant or had any major solo shows, and isn’t at the beginning of his career…which are all red flags), and I have no idea that this piece, in all likelihood, isn’t going to appreciate in value, so selling it after I’m gone probably won’t make the dent I envision it will in paying for my grandkid’s college education. I trust the gallerist, because knowing the art market and pricing pieces accordingly is their job, right?

I know, I know. My entire rant screams #FirstWorldWhitePeopleProblems. I just don’t like seeing anyone taken advantage of. Period. They probably hate thirty-somethings like me with art history degrees and enough knowledge of the art market to be dangerous…

**steps off soapbox**